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December 8, 2011 / jmeuropeana

Top 10 most viewed Europeana objects for November

So, the time has come to see whether the changes we have made to the Europeana portal and the mechanisms we have there of featuring items have indeed had an effect on what the most viewed objects in Europeana are. November was the first whole month after the changes, so this data should be relatively reliable.

1. A Romanian apple cider press (facebook share)
Teasc pentru must de mere

2. A German theological book from 1752 (facebook share)
Die Verdienste der Stadt Nürnberg um den Catechismum Lutheri oder nürnbergische Catechismus- und Kinderlehren-Historie : nebst denen dahin gehörigen Beilagen

3. Czech-Gipsy and Gipsy-Czech dictionary
Slovník česko-cikánský a cikánsko-český jakož i cikánsko-české pohádky a povídky

4. a London city map (used as an example on data.europeana.eu, our Linked Open Data pilot)
the Cittie of London 31

5. Dante’s Divine Comedy (featured object on europeana.eu)
The Divine Comedy;Divina Commedia di Dante Alighieri

6. a bookbinding for Emperor Charles V (featured object on europeana.eu)
Bookbinding for Emperor Charles V

7. The musical score to Mozart’s Requiem (featured object on europeana.eu)
Requiem KV 626

8. Rembrandt’s picture of an old woman (probably his mother) reading (featured object on europeana.eu)
Een oude vrouw, waarschijnlijk Rembrandts moeder, Neeltgen Willemsdr van Zuydtbroeck (gest 1640), vermoedelijk voorgesteld als de profetes Anna

9. A late 16th century mediacal text by Pierandrea Matthioli (featured object on europeana.eu)
Discorsi nelli sei libri di Pedacio Dioscoride Anazarbeo

10. an advertizing brochure for Citroen cars (featured object on europeana.eu, and one that I added personally – yes, I wield awesome power)
Citroën

So, what can we learn from this? The best way to get ‘Most viewed object in Europeana’ is a bit of a surprise. I had expected it to be the featured objects that would be most viewed. And that is important, but easily trunmped by being shared on Facebook.
We keep learning about this stuff as we go along – which is exactly why we keep monitoring these and also valyue your input and comments.

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